Ethics 101

December 19, 2008 at 11:28 AM | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Throughout many of our lessons and discussions these past 9 weeks, ethics has been a popular topic. In relation to online direct marketing, permission-based e-mail marketing, web site data capture, and SPAM all address issues of ethics dealing with consumer privacy. In relation to children and youth, advertising towards this age group via TV from food, candy, and toy companies has recently been in heated debates. Finally, in relation to paid placement and paid inclusion search advertising, ethics has been brought up in terms of how knowledgeable the consumer is.

 

Ethical debates dealing with advertising will never become obsolete. There will always be an organization, an advertiser, or a consumer ready to create hostility or cause interruption within society that will address an ethical issue. “People in advertising spend a lot of their time dealing with ethical choices, and those choices are almost never black and white. They’re subtle, shades-of-gray choices, juicy enough for a Philosophy major” (Moore, 2004).

 

Popular ethical issues are among cause-relation marketing, tobacco advertising, alcohol, condoms, children, pharmaceutical advertising, product placement, and subliminal advertising (Moore, 2004). Whether or not people feel a certain celebrity has a “right” to be advertising a product, to a tobacco company advocating anti-smoking campaigns to children, to TV commercials consisting of animated spokes-characters persuading children to nag parents to purchase their product, someone, somewhere will have a problem with it. Others will not.

 

So concluding, advertising is communication to persuade humans to buy or consume a company’s brand.  That will remain to be its goal and the advertising world understands that ethical boundaries will continue to be pushed and damage control (i.e. Public Relations) will be its saving grace.

 

This brings to an end 9 weeks of blogging, creating interesting thoughts and demonstrating my critical analysis of the previous week’s class discussions and lessons. I can honestly say this blog may be abandoned. However, it’ll remain open for public comments and review; should you see an interesting topic you’d like me to post about your comment can be reached through my email.

 

Happy Holidays! Looking forward to a bright and happy 2009

Throughout many of our lessons and discussions these past 9 weeks, ethics has been a popular topic. In relation to online direct marketing, permission-based e-mail marketing, web site data capture, and SPAM all address issues of ethics dealing with consumer privacy. In relation to children and youth, advertising towards this age group via TV from food, candy, and toy companies has recently been in heated debates. Finally, in relation to paid placement and paid inclusion search advertising, ethics has been brought up in terms of how knowledgeable the consumer is.

 

Ethical debates dealing with advertising will never become obsolete. There will always be an organization, an advertiser, or a consumer ready to create hostility or cause interruption within society that will address an ethical issue. “People in advertising spend a lot of their time dealing with ethical choices, and those choices are almost never black and white. They’re subtle, shades-of-gray choices, juicy enough for a Philosophy major” (Moore, 2004).

 

Popular ethical issues are among cause-relation marketing, tobacco advertising, alcohol, condoms, children, pharmaceutical advertising, product placement, and subliminal advertising (Moore, 2004). Whether or not people feel a certain celebrity has a “right” to be advertising a product, to a tobacco company advocating anti-smoking campaigns to children, to TV commercials consisting of animated spokes-characters persuading children to nag parents to purchase their product, someone, somewhere will have a problem with it. Others will not.

 

So concluding, advertising is communication to persuade humans to buy or consume a company’s brand.  That will remain to be its goal and the advertising world understands that ethical boundaries will continue to be pushed and damage control (i.e. Public Relations) will be its saving grace.

 

This brings to an end 9 weeks of blogging, creating interesting thoughts and demonstrating my critical analysis of the previous week’s class discussions and lessons. I can honestly say this blog may be abandoned. However, it’ll remain open for public comments and review; should you see an interesting topic you’d like me to post about your comment can be reached through my email.

 

Happy Holidays! Looking forward to a bright and happy 2009 J

 

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